Does GMAT Test Vocab­u­lary ?

Does GMAT Test Vocab­u­lary ?

May 20, 2018 0 By vivek

Does GMAT test vocab­u­lary? This is the most com­mon ques­tion stu­dent come across, So we at PrepChief decid­ed to write an arti­cle answer­ing this ques­tion about GMAT Vocab­u­lary.

The Grad­u­ate Man­age­ment Admis­sion Test (GMAT) is the gate­way into some of the best Man­age­ment Schools across the globe. The objec­tive of this entrance exam is to test can­di­dates on apti­tude, rea­son­ing and prob­lem-solv­ing abil­i­ty. GMAT is split into four sec­tions, name­ly Quan­ti­ta­tive, Inte­grat­ed Rea­son­ing, Ver­bal and Ana­lyt­i­cal Writ­ing.
The quan­ti­ta­tive sec­tion in GMAT has prob­lem solv­ing and data suf­fi­cien­cy ques­tions which test math­e­mat­i­cal and com­put­ing abil­i­ty. Inte­grat­ed Rea­son­ing in GMAT tests inter­pre­ta­tion of data which may be graph­i­cal, tab­u­lar or ver­bal. This sec­tion is designed to mea­sure can­di­dates’ abil­i­ty to read, inter­pret and draw insights from data. The lan­guage used is sim­ple and eas­i­ly under­stood. Ver­bal and Ana­lyt­i­cal writ­ing are the two sec­tions that eval­u­ate can­di­dates on the Eng­lish lan­guage.
Ana­lyt­i­cal Writ­ing in GMAT requires a cri­tique of the argu­ment pre­sent­ed. The can­di­date may ques­tion under­ly­ing assump­tions, sug­gest counter inter­pre­ta­tions, indi­cate alter­na­tive exam­ples and draw infer­ences from state­ments, but the test does not ask for opin­ions or tak­ing a stand.
The ver­bal sec­tion in GMAT is designed to assess read­ing and com­pre­hen­sion abil­i­ty, as well as capac­i­ty for rea­son­ing and eval­u­at­ing argu­ments. It is in no way a mea­sure of vocab­u­lary. All ques­tions in the ver­bal sec­tion are mul­ti­ple-choice, of one of three types:
1. Read­ing Com­pre­hen­sion
2. Crit­i­cal Rea­son­ing
3. Sen­tence Cor­rec­tion
Read­ing com­pre­hen­sion ques­tions are based on pas­sages. These pas­sages may dis­cuss a vari­ety of sub­ject areas but no deep under­stand­ing of any is expect­ed. Empha­sis is sim­ply on the abil­i­ty to under­stand and draw con­clu­sions from the data. Crit­i­cal rea­son­ing is more about mak­ing or eval­u­at­ing argu­ments and devis­ing plans of action for the giv­en sit­u­a­tion. Sen­tence Cor­rec­tion is about test­ing gram­mar, to ensure com­mu­ni­ca­tion that con­veys the mean­ing intend­ed.
Oth­er exams like the GRE and SAT have ques­tions that require deep vocab­u­lary. The rea­son is sim­ple. These exams are used as eval­u­a­tion mea­sures for a wide range of cours­es includ­ing lit­er­a­ture. For fields where can­di­dates should have the abil­i­ty to express dif­fi­cult ideas or inter­pret obscure feel­ings, vocab­u­lary can only help. GMAT, on the hand, is more focused on test­ing apti­tude for busi­ness.
For prac­ti­cal-mind­ed, busi­ness ori­ent­ed pro­fes­sion­als, the abil­i­ty to glean the infor­ma­tion that a Wall Street Jour­nal or An Eco­nom­ic Times present will go a long way. Busi­ness requires the indi­vid­ual to be able to dis­tin­guish between valid and faulty argu­ments, to state his own case and defend it. Every sale is an argu­ment and every deal, a nego­ti­a­tion. There will be a need to express one­self thor­ough­ly, clear­ly and unam­bigu­ous­ly. There will be reports and read­ing mate­ri­als that will need to be perused, sum­ma­rized, or used for deci­sion mak­ing. It is impor­tant to be able to extract rel­e­vant infor­ma­tion, or how to present data. It is cru­cial to be able to draw insights that will allow for strat­e­gy for­mu­la­tion. There­fore, a com­pre­hen­sive under­stand­ing of busi­ness and eco­nom­ic key­words and jar­gons will prove espe­cial­ly use­ful for can­di­dates here. Eng­lish vocab­u­lary though, is nei­ther a hin­drance nor a sig­nif­i­cant ben­e­fit for GMAT.

The Grad­u­ate Man­age­ment Admis­sion Test (GMAT) is the gate­way into some of the best Man­age­ment Schools across the globe. The objec­tive of this entrance exam is to test can­di­dates on apti­tude, rea­son­ing and prob­lem-solv­ing abil­i­ty. GMAT is split into four sec­tions, name­ly Quan­ti­ta­tive, Inte­grat­ed Rea­son­ing, Ver­bal and Ana­lyt­i­cal Writ­ing.
The quan­ti­ta­tive sec­tion in GMAT has prob­lem solv­ing and data suf­fi­cien­cy ques­tions which test math­e­mat­i­cal and com­put­ing abil­i­ty. Inte­grat­ed Rea­son­ing in GMAT tests inter­pre­ta­tion of data which may be graph­i­cal, tab­u­lar or ver­bal. This sec­tion is designed to mea­sure can­di­dates’ abil­i­ty to read, inter­pret and draw insights from data. The lan­guage used is sim­ple and eas­i­ly under­stood. Ver­bal and Ana­lyt­i­cal writ­ing are the two sec­tions that eval­u­ate can­di­dates on the Eng­lish lan­guage.
Ana­lyt­i­cal Writ­ing in GMAT requires a cri­tique of the argu­ment pre­sent­ed. The can­di­date may ques­tion under­ly­ing assump­tions, sug­gest counter inter­pre­ta­tions, indi­cate alter­na­tive exam­ples and draw infer­ences from state­ments, but the test does not ask for opin­ions or tak­ing a stand.
The ver­bal sec­tion in GMAT is designed to assess read­ing and com­pre­hen­sion abil­i­ty, as well as capac­i­ty for rea­son­ing and eval­u­at­ing argu­ments. It is in no way a mea­sure of vocab­u­lary. All ques­tions in the ver­bal sec­tion are mul­ti­ple-choice, of one of three types:
1. Read­ing Com­pre­hen­sion
2. Crit­i­cal Rea­son­ing
3. Sen­tence Cor­rec­tion
Read­ing com­pre­hen­sion ques­tions are based on pas­sages. These pas­sages may dis­cuss a vari­ety of sub­ject areas but no deep under­stand­ing of any is expect­ed. Empha­sis is sim­ply on the abil­i­ty to under­stand and draw con­clu­sions from the data. Crit­i­cal rea­son­ing is more about mak­ing or eval­u­at­ing argu­ments and devis­ing plans of action for the giv­en sit­u­a­tion. Sen­tence Cor­rec­tion is about test­ing gram­mar, to ensure com­mu­ni­ca­tion that con­veys the mean­ing intend­ed.
Oth­er exams like the GRE and SAT have ques­tions that require deep vocab­u­lary. The rea­son is sim­ple. These exams are used as eval­u­a­tion mea­sures for a wide range of cours­es includ­ing lit­er­a­ture. For fields where can­di­dates should have the abil­i­ty to express dif­fi­cult ideas or inter­pret obscure feel­ings, vocab­u­lary can only help. GMAT, on the hand, is more focused on test­ing apti­tude for busi­ness.
For prac­ti­cal-mind­ed, busi­ness ori­ent­ed pro­fes­sion­als, the abil­i­ty to glean the infor­ma­tion that a Wall Street Jour­nal or An Eco­nom­ic Times present will go a long way. Busi­ness requires the indi­vid­ual to be able to dis­tin­guish between valid and faulty argu­ments, to state his own case and defend it. Every sale is an argu­ment and every deal, a nego­ti­a­tion. There will be a need to express one­self thor­ough­ly, clear­ly and unam­bigu­ous­ly. There will be reports and read­ing mate­ri­als that will need to be perused, sum­ma­rized, or used for deci­sion mak­ing. It is impor­tant to be able to extract rel­e­vant infor­ma­tion, or how to present data. It is cru­cial to be able to draw insights that will allow for strat­e­gy for­mu­la­tion. There­fore, a com­pre­hen­sive under­stand­ing of busi­ness and eco­nom­ic key­words and jar­gons will prove espe­cial­ly use­ful for can­di­dates here. Eng­lish vocab­u­lary though, is nei­ther a hin­drance nor a sig­nif­i­cant ben­e­fit for GMAT.